OWASP Top10 2007 vs. 2006

OWASPAndrew van der Stock announced the availability of OWASP Top 10 2007 .

The primary aim of the OWASP Top 10 is to educate developers, designers, architects and organizations about the consequences of the most common web application security vulnerabilities. The Top 10 provides basic methods to protect against these vulnerabilities – a great start to your secure coding security program.

It’s interesting to see how things have changed compared to 2006 :

  2006 2007
A1

Information from web requests is not validated before being used by a web application. Attackers can use these flaws to attack backend components through a web application.

XSS flaws occur whenever an application takes user supplied data and sends it to a web browser without first validating or encoding that content. XSS allows attackers to execute script in the victim²s browser which can hijack user sessions, deface web sites, possibly introduce worms, etc.

A2

 Restrictions on what authenticated users are allowed to do are not properly enforced. Attackers can exploit these flaws to access other users’ accounts, view sensitive files, or use unauthorized functions

Injection flaws, particularly SQL injection, are common in web applications. Injection occurs when user-supplied data is sent to an interpreter as part of a command or query. The attacker’s hostile data tricks the interpreter into executing unintended commands or changing data. Malicious file execution attacks affect PHP, XML and any framework which accepts filenames or files from users.

A3

Account credentials and session tokens are not properly protected. Attackers that can compromise passwords, keys, session cookies, or other tokens can defeat authentication restrictions and assume other users’ identit

Code vulnerable to remote file inclusion (RFI) allows attackers to include hostile code Insert non-formatted text hereand data, resulting in devastating attacks, such as total server compromise.

A4

The web application can be used as a mechanism to transport an attack to an end user’s browser. A successful attack can disclose the end user?s session token, attack the local machine, or spoof content to fool the user.

A direct object reference occurs when a developer exposes a reference to an internal implementation object, such as a file, directory, database record, or key, as a URL or form parameter. Attackers can manipulate those references to access other objects without authorization.

A5

Web application components in some languages that do not properly validate input can be crashed and, in some cases, used to take control of a process. These components can include CGI, libraries, drivers, and web application server components.

A CSRF attack forces a logged-on victim’s browser to send a pre-authenticated request to a vulnerable web application, which then forces the victim’s browser to perform a hostile action to the benefit of the attacker. CSRF can be as powerful as the web application that it attacks.

A6

Web applications pass parameters when they access external systems or the local operating system. If an attacker can embed malicious commands in these parameters, the external system may execute those commands on behalf of the web

Applications can unintentionally leak information about their configuration, internal workings, or violate privacy through a variety of application problems. Attackers use this weakness to steal sensitive data, or conduct more serious attacks.

A7

Error conditions that occur during normal operation are not handled properly. If an attacker can cause errors to occur that the web application does not handle, they can gain detailed system information, deny service, cause security mechanisms to fail, or crash the server.

Account credentials and session tokens are often not properly protected. Attackers compromise passwords, keys, or authentication tokens to assume other users’ identities.

A8

Web applications frequently use cryptographic functions to protect information and credentials. These functions and the code to integrate them have proven difficult to code properly, frequently resulting in weak protection.

Web applications rarely use cryptographic functions properly to protect data and credentials. Attackers use weakly protected data to conduct identity theft and other crimes, such as credit card fraud.

A9

Attackers can consume web application resources to a point where other legitimate users can no longer access or use the application. Attackers can also lock users out of their accounts or even cause the entire application to fail.

Applications frequently fail to encrypt network traffic when it is necessary to protect sensitive communications.

A10

Having a strong server configuration standard is critical to a secure web application. These servers have many configuration options that affect security and are not secure out of the box.

Frequently, an application the only protectsprotection for sensitive functionality by preventing the displayareas of an application is links or URLs are not presented to unauthorized users. Attackers can use this weakness to access and perform unauthorized operations by accessing those URLs directly.

It’s interesting to see that Buffer Overflows and Application Denial of Service are out for good.
Here’s the wiki version http://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2007



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